May 5, 2012

Record Art Sale Boosts Orders for 'The Scream' Poster

Rate this posting:
{[['', '']]}
{["Useless", "Boring", "Need more details", "Perfect"]}



.
0504_scream_630x420


One of four original versions of Edvard Munch’s iconic and often parodied work The Scream sold for $119,922,500 at Sotheby’s (BID). It was a record-shattering transaction. Previously, the highest sum to change hands at auction for a work of art was $106.5 million, in 2010, for Nude, Green Leaves and Bust, a painting by Pablo Picasso.

After this week’s sale, however, Norwegian businessman Petter Olsen, who is the painting’s previous owner, and the citizens of Hvitsten, Norway, who will enjoy a forthcoming museum funded by the proceeds, aren’t the only ones reaping the benefits.

“Before this week, The Scream was a steady seller,” says Geoffroy Martin, the chief executive officer of Art.com, the world’s largest retailer of prints, movie posters, framed art, and other mass-produced wall decor. “I’d say it’s [usually] in the top 50. On Wednesday its sales increased three to four times. Sales increased 10 times yesterday. From a unit point of view, it was the top seller yesterday.”

Art.com, which merged with AllPosters.com in 2005, sells prints of millions of different works of art, and just as many posters. According to Martin, the Emeryville (Calif.)-based company has annual revenue of “well over $100 million.” (Art.com is a private company and does not release exact sales figures.) It maintains localized websites in 25 countries and partnerships with several museums, including the Museum of Modern Art in New York and the de Young Museum in San Francisco. (It’s a good bet you can trace the provenance of that Cézanne still life hanging in a high school classroom, or that Goodfellas poster pinned to the wall in a college dorm, to this site.)

“Whenever there is meaningful news that has an impact on an image, we’re going to see a big spike,” says Martin. “Whenever there is a sports team winning a championship like the World Series—or a blockbuster movie release. Last year we saw a big spike with the royal wedding and the British royal family. There’s a new band that is killing right now from the U.K. called One Direction. As for [The Scream], there’s nothing that looks like it. When it was painted, it was entirely unique and controversial. When you see it, you know that there is something special about it.”

On a typical day, the bestselling prints are paintings by Van Gogh such as Almond Blossoms and The Starry Night, works by Andy Warhol such as Three Elvises, and Monet’s The Artist’s Garden at Giverny.





But this week belongs to The Scream. The painting not only broke art-world records, but it also howled its way to the top spot for carbon-copy art—which was no humble feat. Martin had to consult his data to be certain that The Scream usually outsells its most popular spoof, a version of the painting with Homer Simpson in the face-clapped pose. (For the record, it does.)




source 


.

May 3, 2012

Munch's The Scream rivals even the Mona Lisa

Rate this posting:
{[['', '']]}
{["Useless", "Boring", "Need more details", "Perfect"]}



.



It is one of the most influential and most widely parodied and pastiched paintings ever created. When it comes to a universally recognisable image that every artist, designer and illustrator feels they have a right to purloin for their own purposes, ‘The Scream’ rivals even the Mona Lisa. 

Its creator, the Norwegian painter Edvard Munch is generally thought of as one of the most intensely serious of artists. But when it came to understanding the commercial potential of what he had created, he was no fool. Munch created four versions of ‘The Scream’, one of which, a pastel from 1895, went under the hammer at Sotheby’s in New York last night, selling for $119.9m (£73.9m), becoming the most expensive artwork ever sold at auction. 

But what is it that makes ‘the Scream’ so enduringly fascinating? You might think that a painting that has been so freely, and generally irreverently, interpreted by artists as diverse as Andy Warhol, Simpsons creator Matt Groning and and horror movie mogul Wes Craven would be impossible to take seriously. Yet ‘The Scream’ feels even more resonant now than when it was painted. 

Created between 1893 and 1910, the various versions of ‘The Scream’ belong to the period in art that is most appealing in art to a general audience today, the era – broadly speaking – of the Impressionists, van Gogh and the early Picasso, when art was freeing itself of the shackles of the past, but still had something comprehensible to say. Breakthroughs were being made in every field of human endeavour, many of which still impact on our lives today. The strength of ‘The Scream’ is that it speaks simultaneously of artistic liberation and of our ever greater understanding of who we are. 

Even fifty years ago, ‘The Scream’ would have been considered extremely difficult by most gallery goers, the grotesque product of a deranged mind. Now, however, we see it as self-evidently ‘true’ and universal in its relevance.
Born in 1863, and 36 when he painted the first version of ‘The Scream’, Munch is widely believed to have suffered from bipolar disorder. Writing of the painting’s creation in his journal he described walking with two friends by the waterside in Oslo, and the sky turning ‘red as blood’. He stopped, feeling ‘unspeakably tired. Tongues of fire and blood stretched over the bluish black fjord. My friends went on walking, while I lagged behind shivering with fear. Then I heard the enormous, infinite scream of nature.’


Sotheby's the evening The Scream was auctioned

 



While it has been argued, with slight plausibility, that Munch was seeing red dust thrown up by the volcanic eruption at Krakatoa, this is more or less irrelevant to our understanding of the painting. What he shows us is how something that might normally be considered beautiful and reassuring, a sunset, can become the agent of overwhelming dread. This sense of anguish isn’t localised to the sufferer, the strange, hairless figure in the bottom centre, but vibrates through every inch of the painting. The swirling lines of the land and water are infected by the mental miasma radiating from the sky, while the straight lines of the pier, with two ominous figures approaching from the rear are oppressive in their very rigidity. 


The central figure with its hands raised to its startled light bulb of a face may have been inspired by a Peruvian mummy exhibited in the 1889 Paris Exhibition, as has been widely claimed, but it is anonymity of this figure – with no discernible sex, age or ethnicity – that gives the painting its universality. Rather than showing us an individual, Munch shows us what we feel like in moments of isolation and mental agony. 


At the time of the painting’s first unveiling, when depression was poorly understood, when mental illness was considered a shameful sign of weakness and people generally were discouraged from thinking about their selves, ‘The Scream’ would have been seen as at best distasteful. But now, after a century of the ever-increasing influence of Freud and his followers, when ‘getting in touch with our feelings’ is simply what we do, the figure in ‘The Scream’ has become a kind of Everyman. Rather than seeing him as a pitiable wretch, we think ‘I’ve been there’, or if not quite, then that we almost certainly will be at some point in our lives. The person who has never come close to the degree of extremity depicted in ‘The Scream’ is, we tend to feel, a rather superficial and spiritually impoverished human being. 




source 



.

Mein Canvas: Crude watercolours painted by a young Adolf Hitler sell for £1,600

Rate this posting:
{[['', '']]}
{["Useless", "Boring", "Need more details", "Perfect"]}



.
At first glance these watercolours look rather unremarkable. 


But a closer inspection of the signatures and AH monogram reveals their dark origin.


These are the works of Nazi leader Adolf Hitler and have just sold more £1,600 at auction.


Sketch: This painting called 'Der Lehrling Muster' which translates as 'The Apprentice Model' or 'The Apprentice Sample', shows a figure operating a laundry mangle or a printing press and bears Adolf Hitler's signature, dated 1912
Sketch: This painting called 'Der Lehrling Muster' which translates as 'The Apprentice Model' or 'The Apprentice Sample', shows a figure operating a laundry mangle or a printing press and bears Adolf Hitler's signature, dated 1912



The paintings, ‘Der Lehrling Muster’ and ‘A Coastal Scene’ appeared alongside examples of fine art by Lamorna Birch, Gill Watkiss, Robert Lenkiewicz and Sir Terry Frost. 


 ‘Der Lehrling Muster’, which translates as ‘The Apprentice Model’ or ‘The Apprentice Sample’, shows a figure operating a laundry mangle or a printing press.


Hitler painted this 9.2 inch by 6.5 inch piece while struggling as an artist in Vienna in the years before the First World War.


Rejection: Adolf Hitler had set out to be an artist but was repeatedly rejected
Rejection: Adolf Hitler had set out to be an artist but was repeatedly rejected



He was twice rejected by Vienna’s Academy of Fine Arts in 1907 and 1908, because of his 'unfitness for painting'. 


He was living in the city as a young man trying to make a living as a watercolour artist.


The director apparently recommended that Hitler study architecture, but he lacked the academic credentials.


‘A Coastal Scene’, a 5 inch by 7.5 inch work depicting a small sailing boat and a headland, was painted in 1919 after Hitler was badly injured in the trenches. 


The paintings, which were estimated to sell for between £2,000 and £3,000, were sold by Barnes Thomas County Auctioneers in Penzance, Cornwall.


But the sale has not gone done well with those living near the auction house who say much of the value comes from the paintings' association with their mass murderer creator.


Helen Rolfe said: ‘These paintings are not fine, unlike the others presented for sale, but more pertinently are presumably offered because of their association with fascism and murder.


‘Surely no local collector is interested in these? I suspect that the auctioneers anticipate telephone bills from elsewhere.


‘In my opinion, Barnes Thomas should have declined to accept these mediocre pictures by Adolf Hitler, and made a small stand in support of the millions of bereaved families of the post-war period.’

 

Sold: Hitler painted 'A Coastal Scene', which measures 9.2 inch by 6.5 inch, while struggling as an artist in Vienna in the years before the First World War
Sold: Hitler painted 'A Coastal Scene', which measures 9.2 inch by 6.5 inch, while struggling as an artist in Vienna in the years before the First World War









source

.

Monet - Water Lilies

Rate this posting:
{[['', '']]}
{["Useless", "Boring", "Need more details", "Perfect"]}



.



The painted canvas is 36 Inches wide and 24 Inches tall.
Orientation: Horizontal
Title: Water Lilies
Artist: Claude Monet
Size: 24X36 inch canvas

 Easily recognizable, Water Lilies by Claude Monet has been carefully redone to near perfection with color and brush stroke detailing. The Water Lilies painting is actually a series of 250 oil paintings by Monet. They depict Monet’s garden in Giverny and were the main subjects of his paintings later in his career.

Monet, a French Impressionist, was born in Paris is 1840, and pursued his passion for painting from the start befriending fellow Impressionist artists. The outdoors clearly inspired Monet to take most of his subject matter from nature’s beauty. His use of realistic colors and attention to detail still inspire painters today. 




source

.

Introducing the 'slow art' movement; it's like the 'slow food' movement, with art (and food)

Rate this posting:
{[['', '']]}
{["Useless", "Boring", "Need more details", "Perfect"]}



.
introducing-slow-art-movement-its-slow-food-movement-art-and-food
 Examining Reed Danziger's 'Continuous Duality of Energies'


The abstract painting by Reed Danziger, exploding with colors and shapes, brought to mind a collage, said a painter and teacher of Hebrew from Israel. An artist from Brooklyn demurred. There was so much going on—it gave her the sense of standing in front of a manifesto, she insisted. Surely it resembled a film strip, argued a painter from Long Island City.


The artists were gathered at McKenzie Fine Art gallery in Chelsea for Slow Art Day, an annual event during which art lovers visit local museums and galleries to look—slowly, deliberately, and thoughtfully—at pre-selected works, and then repair to lunch to discuss the experience.


Slow Art Day began in August 2009 with a single venue—the Museum of Modern Art here in New York—and just four participants. The concept was an instant hit; it expanded to 55 sites across the world in April 2010 and to 101 in 2012—this year’s selections ranged from a sculpture garden in Ohio to contemporary works in Poland, and from a food-related art tour of Manchester, England to photographs and video installations at the Tate Britain in London. At each venue, a volunteer host selects the art to be viewed. As a result, “art” is defined in its most diverse and subjective sense.


As the annual event approaches in April, it is promoted through social networks such as Facebook, Twitter, and Tumblr. Participants sign up through the group's website or via the online ticketing service Eventbrite, but walk-ins are typically welcome too. Although the event is free, guests pay for any museum tickets and for the wrap-up lunch.


The idea, organizers say on their website, is to “slow down and really see art” by spending 10 minutes meditating on each work rather than “breezing past artworks in the standard eight seconds.” But, at the McKenzie gallery at least, slowing down to see art didn’t seem to mean quieting down to contemplate the works.


Host Alison Pierz explained that Slow Art Day was inspired by the Slow Food movement. “I like to think of art as sustenance,” she said. “It sounds hokey, but it’s good for the soul. These things take time to make, so let’s take time to appreciate them.” Slow Art Day intends to draw “regular folks,” she added, but—as the members of her group made clear—it sometimes attracts more “art world people” the bigger it gets. “It’s become a thing,” said Pierz, a former gallery director. “This is like preaching to the choir to a certain extent.”


Paige Pedri, a sculptor from New York, circled her hands in front of one section of Danziger’s An Ordering of Momentum and then over another. “What’s happening over here and what’s happening over here are completely different,” she observed.


Others in the group drew in closer to share their own insights. Liliana Perez, a painter from Long Island City, inclined her head towards the painting’s midsection, which was streaked with colorful geometric shapes. “The one thing that holds a painting is a line, and a line is a very dangerous thing to hold a painting with,” she said briskly. Nicole Laemmle, a painter from Brooklyn, traced the same area in air with a fuchsia nail. “I feel there’s too much thought by the artist in this piece,” she murmured.


More discussion followed, until the event host announced it was time to move on to the next venue—Galerie Protégé, a startup that showcases works by emerging artists in Chelsea’s gallery district.


As the group walked down a few blocks, Michal Nachmany, the Hebrew teacher, explained what drew her to the event.


“It’s good for me as a teaching tool,” she said. “I teach adults, and they are jumpy in their heads. So this is a way to do things slower, and get into the depth of things, and concentrate more.”


A few minutes later, the group entered Chelsea Frames, a framing studio on Ninth Avenue, and wound down a spiral staircase to Galerie Protégé in the basement. Abstract acrylic works on paper and canvas by local painter Paul Thomas hung under track lighting in the clean white space. The critique began at once.


“It’s almost like stained glass,” said Laemmle.


“It’s very joyous, it’s very alive,” said Pedri.


“There’s a luminosity in the light,” said Perez.


In one corner of the room, Thomas, who was participating in the gallery tour, deconstructed his own painting, Inner Thoughts, for a viewer.


“The more you look at the painting, the more you will find,” he said, smiling. His long-nailed hands slid sinuously in the air as he traced a flowing form on canvas here, a wash of color there. “The art is only as good as the interaction you have with it.” His hands mimicked a flower furling and unfurling; a stack of gold rings on a finger glistened. “It comes together and opens up, and when you follow things, it disappears and dissipates,” he said.


Meanwhile, on the shop level upstairs, gallerist Debra Kowalski remarked that many visitors fail to engage with the art on display in the gallery. “We had a guy in this morning,” she said. “He did a 180 and came back upstairs. He didn’t take time to take it in.” She gave a small smile. “There’s a whole art to looking at artwork.”


The event wrapped up. Some members of the group made their way to The Half King restaurant and bar for the post-tour debriefing. The menus arrived and were examined in a reverential silence to match just about any other object that day. Buffalo burgers and Caesar salads were ordered.


The talk veered to birdwatching in Central Park and country homes in Pennsylvania, and to the contrast both offer to urban life. That brought the conversation back to the respite Slow Art Day offers from the clamor of blockbuster shows and dizzy opening receptions, and then to art in general.


“Art,” said Thomas expansively, “is the most non-utilitarian thing you can buy with the greatest amount of status. It’s not like a Rolls Royce.”


“To say art has no function, that is where things get tricky,” Pierz countered.





source 

.

May 1, 2012

Leonardo da Vinci: Anatomist, The Queen’s Gallery, review

Rate this posting:
{[['', '']]}
{["Useless", "Boring", "Need more details", "Perfect"]}



. 

Leonardo da Vinci's anatomical studies are not only aesthetically beautiful, they tell a fascinating story too. 



Leonardo da Vinci's drawings of the heart and coronary vessels
Leonardo da Vinci's drawings of the heart and coronary vessels, c.1511-13 Photo: The Royal Collection Trust © 2012 Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II



It is less than three months since the National Gallery’s blockbuster Leonardo exhibition closed — and yet here he is again, the star of a new show at the Queen’s Gallery at Buckingham Palace. While the NG focused on Leonardo’s role as court artist to the Milanese ruler Ludovico Sforza during the 1480s and 1490s, this time the emphasis is on his magnificent anatomical studies. 

That’s the thing about Leonardo: just when you think you’ve got a handle on his talents, he wrong-foots you by excelling in another field altogether. If ever we needed a reminder that he is the archetype of the mercurial “Renaissance man”, here it is. 

One of the conundrums of Leonardo is that what he created was so erratic and diverse. As the National Gallery’s exhibition taught us, when it came to making a painting, he had difficulty finishing the job. During a career spanning half a century, he probably began no more than 20 paintings. Only about 15 survive on which art historians agree are entirely his, and, of these, at least four are incomplete. When it came to making drawings and notes, however, Leonardo couldn’t stop. He began keeping notebooks in his mid-thirties, and covered on average one or two sheets with text and drawings every day until his death aged 67 in 1519. 

Of the many pages of obsessive notes that he bequeathed to his friend and pupil Francesco Melzi, up to 7,000 sheets are known today (estimates vary). 

This is only a fraction of his total output — towards the end of his life, Leonardo spoke of the “infinity of volumes” that he had written — yet the extant pages still cover a welter of subjects including aerodynamics, optics, botany, and mathematics. (Not for nothing did the art historian Kenneth Clark call Leonardo “the most relentlessly curious man in history”.)
We think of Leonardo as a painter, but for the majority of his life he behaved more like a scientist — studying the properties of water, endeavouring to understand the secrets of flight, designing robots, and so on. And the scientific field in which he most excelled was that of human anatomy. 


A skull sectioned,1489, in Leonardo da Vinci's sketch book and right a page from his notebook, including his 'to do' list, c.1510


The story of what happened to Leonardo’s papers after his death is complicated but crucial. Despite intending to publish several pioneering treatises, Leonardo never got around to ordering his miscellaneous manuscripts — and neither did Melzi. Towards the end of the 16th century, the sculptor Pompeo Leoni bought a load of Leonardo’s papers from Melzi’s son, and carved them up (sometimes literally) into different albums — including one, consisting of about 600 sheets, which ended up in Windsor Castle. Approximately a quarter of the manuscripts in the Royal Collection are anatomical studies, and these represent almost all of Leonardo’s surviving drawings on the subject. 


There have been exhibitions of Leonardo’s studies of the human body in the past, including one at the Royal Academy in 1977. But the new exhibition at the Queen’s Gallery is the most extensive yet. Showcasing almost 90 drawings, immaculately arranged by the rigorous scholar Martin Clayton, it is also the first to present the complex evolution of Leonardo’s thinking on the subject in a chronological fashion, from his first forays into the field during the 1480s to his spellbinding studies of the workings of the heart from 1511-13, which continue to astound cardiac surgeons to this day. 


In other words, this is the most complete display of anatomical drawings by Leonardo that we are ever likely to get. 


The first gallery presents the early glimmerings of Leonardo’s interest in anatomy. A series of drawings from the middle of the 1480s suggests that, to begin with, his knowledge was based not on first-hand observation, but on speculative classical literature stretching back to Galen and Aristotle. 


The first breakthrough, though, came at the end of the decade, when Leonardo inscribed a new notebook with the words “On the 2nd day of April 1489”, later adding “Book entitled On the Human Figure”, and began a number of brilliantly observed studies of the human skull. 


After this impressive start, though, his anatomical investigations went into abeyance for a decade or so. As we see in the second gallery, he returned to the subject after 1503, when he was commissioned to create an enormous mural of the Battle of Anghiari in the Palazzo della Signoria in Florence. An enhanced understanding of anatomical structures probably helped him plan its intricate composition, which was never completed (it was subsequently painted over). Another breakthrough occurred in the winter of 1507-8, when he dissected a man who was more than 100 years old. 


In the final gallery, we see a set of often double-sided sheets filled with worked-up drawings of bones and muscles. These date from the winter of 1510-11, when Leonardo was close to finishing his book On the Human Figure that he had begun two decades earlier. 


By this stage, he was probably collaborating with the anatomy professor Marcantonio della Torre in the medical school of the university of Pavia, 20 miles south of Milan, which would have given him a ready source of cadavers for dissection. By the end of his life, he boasted that he had anatomised more than 30 corpses. 


Elsewhere in the final gallery, we see Leonardo’s famous drawings of a foetus (for the first time in his anatomical illustrations, he uses colour — red chalk — to delineate this cramped bundle of human potential), as well as his peerlessly accurate studies of ox hearts. In experiments and sketches from circa 1512-13, Leonardo examined the flow of blood through the aortic valve, gleaning insights that would not be observed again for 400 years. 


I cannot pretend for one second that I fathomed even a fraction of Leonardo’s scientific achievements — his analytical mind was far too advanced for an arts-fuddled brain like mine. That said, his complex yet lucid drawings, surrounded by precise left-handed notes written using his habitual right-to-left “mirror script”, are obviously close to perfection. 


From an aesthetic point of view, Leonardo’s draughtsmanship is breathtaking. In technical terms, the way he depicted the human body — mobilising cross-section and the engineering device of the “exploded view” — was far ahead of his time. 


Examining these manuscripts also affords an irresistible sense of proximity to a great mind. Every sheet jostles and teems with reflections, ideas and observations — the fossilised remains of someone’s synapses firing on all cylinders half a millennium ago. 


Ever the disciple of experience, Leonardo refused to follow slavishly the flyblown teachings of the ancients. Instead, his restless, questing spirit demanded that he observe things for himself — which meant overcoming any aversion to cutting up cadavers, which in those days was a much sloppier and more disgusting business than it is today. In this respect, Leonardo offers a paradigm of the profound shift that occurred during the Renaissance, from a medieval mindset to a modern sensibility. 


There is something very poignant about this exhibition, too. Had he published the treatise on anatomy that he’d planned, Leonardo would be considered one of the great scientists of the Renaissance — if not all time. But because he never managed to do so, his anatomical drawings essentially disappeared from view for hundreds of years — which meant that they had little impact on scientists of a later age. 


What a curious thing: to dominate a field so thoroughly, and yet for the fruits of your research to wither into oblivion for almost four centuries, before blooming back to life. 





source 

.

Art dealer spends £2million proving obscure oil painting is lost Turner masterpiece

Rate this posting:
{[['', '']]}
{["Useless", "Boring", "Need more details", "Perfect"]}



.
When Frank Faryab bought an obscure oil painting for thousands of pounds in a private sale, it was just the start of his outlay on the work.


For the art and antiques dealer has since spent more than £2million and much of the past five years trying to convince others it was by JMW Turner, one of Britain's greatest painters.


The perseverance appears to have paid off - because three leading authorities on the artist work now agree it is a lost Turner masterpiece which could be worth about £4million.


Perseverance: Frank Faryab has spent more than £2million and much of the past five years trying to convince others this painting is by JMW Turner
Perseverance: Frank Faryab has spent more than £2million and much of the past five years trying to convince others this painting is by JMW Turner




Experts at the auction house Sotheby's will examine the painting in detail next month and may accept it for sale.
The highest price ever fetched by a Turner work is £29.7million.


Mr Faryab, who lives in Cirencester, Gloucestershire, was tipped off in 2007 that the painting might be by Turner, although it was sold as a minor work by another artist 'in the manner of Turner'.


Looking good: Mr Faryab has had the painting cleaned and reframed and has gathered scientific evidence, checking fingerprints and artistic tests to prove its provenance
Looking good: Mr Faryab has had the painting cleaned and reframed and has gathered scientific evidence, checking fingerprints and artistic tests to prove its provenance




He will not say how much he paid for the seascape, a 20in x 16in oil-on-pine panel of a hazy sailing ship, but he can list the great lengths he went to for the painting to gain recognition.


He has had the painting cleaned and reframed and has gathered scientific evidence, including infrared dating, checking fingerprints and artistic tests to prove its provenance.


Mr Faryab told the Sunday Times: 'Years of neglect, dirt, soot and nicotine had left their mark.


Prolific: JMW Turner produced several works each day, mostly drawings, etchings and watercolours
Prolific: JMW Turner produced several works each day, mostly drawings, etchings and watercolours




'But I insinctively knew its true quality, which was why I was prepared to invest so much on research proving my judgment.'


Three Turner experts have been to Geneva, where the painting is kept, and all have reported either categorically or 'almost certainly' that the work is by Turner.


One of them, James Hamilton, of Birmingham University, described the work as a 'magnificent Turner'.


He believes that the picture was kept in the artist's studio until his death in 1851, and then sold on by John Pound, the son by a former marriage of the artist's last mistress, Sophia Caroline Booth.


'It just struck me as absolutely right,' the academic said. 'His brush strokes are all over the work.


'It is as if you can feel Turner coming out of the painting.'


James Miller, former deputy chairman of Sotheby's, and the London art dealer Lowell Libson also believe Mr Faryab has bought a Turner.


The picture, painted in October 1844, depicts the boat of the French king, Louis-Philippe, arriving in Portsmouth Harbour.


The French king's journey is well recorded in the papers of the day and in five other paintings owned by the Tate - all Turners.


Historic: The picture, painted in October 1844, depicts the boat of the French king, Louis-Philippe, arriving in Portsmouth Harbour
Historic: The picture, painted in October 1844, depicts the boat of the French king, Louis-Philippe, arriving in Portsmouth Harbour




Another fact which supports Mr Faryab's claim is that Turner and Louis-Philippe were friends.


Astute: Mr Faryab was tipped off in 2007 that the painting might be by Turner, although it was sold as a minor work by another artist 'in the manner of Turner'
Astute: Mr Faryab was tipped off in 2007 that the painting might be by Turner, although it was sold as a minor work by another artist 'in the manner of Turner'




The king even gave the artist a snuff box.


When Mr Faryab bought the painting, it was called Ships at Sea. It now has the grander title The Arrival of King Louis-Philippe.


Turner produced several works a day - mostly drawings, etchings and watercolours - and authorities believe it could be one of about 540 oils the artist is thought to have painted.


Four years before Mr Faryab bought the painting, the Tate identified two of its Turner works, originally thought to be of Venice, as the French king's arrival.


Mr Faryab's painting looks similar to a scene from those pictures, and to another Turner at the Tate called Hurrah! For The Whaler Erebus! Another Fish!


Newly uncovered oil paintings by Turner are rare. The last significant one, Landscape with a Rainbow, was identified in 1995.


The record price for a Turner work was set in 2010, when Modern Rome - Campo Vaccino was sold for £29.7million.


Expensive: The record price for a Turner work was set in 2010, when Modern Rome - Campo Vaccino was sold for £29.7million
Expensive: The record price for a Turner work was set in 2010, when Modern Rome - Campo Vaccino was sold for £29.7million








.

Saginaw artist Neil Davison to donate USS Edson painting to pay for ship's arrival

Rate this posting:
{[['', '']]}
{["Useless", "Boring", "Need more details", "Perfect"]}



.
NeilDavison.JPG
Neil Davison with the oil on canvas painting he made of the USS Edson DD946. Davison is donating half of what he makes on the painting to the Saginaw Valley Naval Ship Museum.



Eight years ago, A Navy veteran created a knife-and-brushstroke painting of the USS Edson when the destroyer's arrival was first expected.
 
The two-by-four foot canvas painting by Neil Davison of Saginaw was exhibited in Bay City, and then stored when the ship's arrival was delayed.

Now, following last week's decision from the Navy to donate the ship to the Saginaw Valley Naval Ship Museum, Davison hopes to sell the painting to benefit the museum.

"I want to promote the ship's arrival," Davison said. "Every little bit helps."

Davison is going to donate half of the proceeds to the museum, and use the other half to cover supply expenses.

"I am over elated that he did this," said Mike Kegley, president of the Saginaw Valley Naval Ship Museum. "That painting was made the year we got the news it went to the Navy."

The Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum in New York City owned the Edson until 2004, where it was used as a museum.

Davison created the Edson painting in stages. In 2004, the painting displayed the bow of the ship on patrol in the Taiwan Straits during its first deployment in 1960. In 2008, Davison added a heavy fog to create atmosphere and drama: he estimates that he spent four weeks on the piece.

"I've always liked marine painters; mostly it goes back to when I was on the docks quite a bit in East Tawas charter fishing as a kid," Davison, 69, said. "It just fed my zen."

Davison has painted hundreds of marine, abstract and religious paintings as a hobby since he first picked up a paintbrush half a century ago. 

Since the economy closed galleries that once exhibited Davison's work, he donates many paintings to the University of Michigan's pediatric transplant department, where they are sold to send adolescent patients to Camp Michitanki in Holly. He has been passionate about helping young patients since his wife received a transplant.

Kegley said that the museum has a $200,000 funding shortfall to get the destroyer to Bangor Township. A breakfast fundraiser is scheduled from 7 a.m. to noon May 22 at Krysiak's House Restaurant, 1605 Michigan Ave.

"We have enough money to get the ship here but, we will have to go in debt," Kegley said. "We would rather not go in debt."





source 



.

Sale of "The Scream" could top auction record: experts

Rate this posting:
{[['', '']]}
{["Useless", "Boring", "Need more details", "Perfect"]}



.

Edvard Munch's "The Scream" could become the most expensive painting ever sold at auction on Wednesday if predictions that the work could fetch up to $150 million are to be believed.



The vibrant pastel, one of four versions by the Scandinavian artist and the only privately owned, is estimated to sell for $80 million when it goes under the hammer at Sotheby's in New York.



But London-based art expert Nicolai Frahm, of Frahm Ltd., believes the price could soar much higher.



"I think it will go to $150 million," he said in a telephone interview, which would smash the auction record of $106.5 million set by Pablo Picasso's "Nude, green leaves and bust" in 2010.



"This is the first time we have ever had such an iconic work up for sale," he added. "This painting is way more famous than the artist ever was."



Other independent art market experts have suggested a final price of around $125 million.



Sotheby's has gone to extraordinary lengths to safeguard the work. It is under 24-hour guard at its New York headquarters, where it is housed in a specially constructed mini-gallery behind a tension wire.



Two of the four Screams were stolen from museums in 1994 and 2004, but both were later recovered. Petter Olsen, whose father was a friend and neighbor of Munch's, is selling an 1895 version, planning to fund a museum with the proceeds.



Sotheby's said it set its estimate intuitively.



"$100 million feels like it might be a barrier," said David Norman, worldwide co-chairman of Impressionist and modern art. "But pictures like this -- where they end up going is a matter of momentum. It really is hard to predict. You're working at determining the price for one of the most unique and rare images of the past 150 years."



Norman said many art enthusiasts had expressed tremendous confidence in a sale price well beyond the pre-sale estimate. The painting's fame could push its price into the stratosphere.



"Occasionally there is a piece like this that is so famed that individuals who don't normally collect say 'I want one of the greatest paintings in the world,'" said Norman.



Simon Shaw, Sotheby's head of Impressionist and modern art in New York, noted that "The Scream" had only become more relevant, and ubiquitous, in recent years, in the context of geo-political and economic turmoil worldwide.



"Art has become extremely sexy. It's become a front-page sensation and gone into the mainstream," said Frahm. "Many more people look at art than they did 10 years ago."



Although most of the attention is focused on "The Scream," both Sotheby's and Christie's, whose sale starts on Tuesday, are boasting many other works worth hundreds of millions, especially in the post-war and contemporary arena.



"We could easily see new records," said Frahm.



Both houses are selling works from important private collections. Sotheby is handling the collection of financier Ted Forstmann, and the $100 million abstract expressionist-dominated Pincus collection will go under the hammer at Christie's.



"There's such a richness of offerings," said Christie's Americas president and chairman Marc Porter.



"Our abstract expressionist works are the best in 20 years," he said. "We have the best Rothko in a decade, the most important Pollack in 15 years."



Christie's Impressionist sale has a pre-sale estimate of up to $140 million. Its star lot, the recently rediscovered Cezanne watercolor study "Card Players, could sell for $20 million.



Its post-war sale, which is expected to take in as much as $350 million, is led by Philip Rothko's "Orange, Red, Yellow" abstract, which is expected to fetch about $40 million, and Yves Klein's "FC 1 (Fire-Color 1)," estimated to sell for about $35 million.



A group of six Richters should fetch more than $40 million.



At Sotheby's, Pablo Picasso's Dora Maar portrait, "Femme assise dans un fauteuil," is expected to fetch $25 million. Works by Chaim Soutine are also poised to draw strong prices.



Andy Warhol's "Double Elvis," with a pre-sale estimate of up to $50 million, is leading Sotheby's contemporary sale and Lichtenstein's "Sleeping Girl" and Francis Bacon's "Figure Writing Reflected in Mirror," could each fetch up to $40 million.





source 


.